CS3 Tinting greyscale images.

Search   Help    Register    Login   Home
Wed, 29 December 2010 08:44 Go to next message
Rob Bradford (Photoshop begginer)
Hi.

I need to tint a greyscale image to a specific RGB value; how do I do
this?

Currently I greyscale the image, then revert to RGB (I think greyscale
has a smoother tonal gradient to desaturation). Once this is complete
I use:

Image > Adjustments > Variations

I then spend ages adding this colour, adding that colour until I give-
up the will to live or get some where near to my target tint.

Is there a method (if you know the RGB valuses for the background
tint), to do this with less pot luck/ messing about?

Any help appreciated.

Rob.
Wed, 29 December 2010 15:31 Go to previous messageGo to next message
nomail (Photoshop expert)
Rob Bradford <rob.bradford2805@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi.
>
> I need to tint a greyscale image to a specific RGB value; how do I do
> this?
>
> Currently I greyscale the image, then revert to RGB (I think greyscale
> has a smoother tonal gradient to desaturation). Once this is complete
> I use:
>
> Image > Adjustments > Variations
>
> I then spend ages adding this colour, adding that colour until I give-
> up the will to live or get some where near to my target tint.
>
> Is there a method (if you know the RGB valuses for the background
> tint), to do this with less pot luck/ messing about?

I'm not sure I understand what you are looking for. How could you tint an
image to a specific RGB color if each pixel has a different greyscale value
to start with? You will end with different RGB values because of that. If
you mean you want to add a specific RGB coloring to the image, you could do
the following.

1. Convert the image to RGB.
2. Add a solid color layer with the RGB value you wanted.
3. Change the layer mode to 'Color'.
4. Flatten


--
Johan W. Elzenga, Editor/Photographer, www.johanfoto.com
Thu, 30 December 2010 13:06 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Joel (Photoshop expert)
Johan W. Elzenga <nomail@please.invalid> wrote:

> Rob Bradford <rob.bradford2805@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Hi.
> >
> > I need to tint a greyscale image to a specific RGB value; how do I do
> > this?
> >
> > Currently I greyscale the image, then revert to RGB (I think greyscale
> > has a smoother tonal gradient to desaturation). Once this is complete
> > I use:
> >
> > Image > Adjustments > Variations
> >
> > I then spend ages adding this colour, adding that colour until I give-
> > up the will to live or get some where near to my target tint.
> >
> > Is there a method (if you know the RGB valuses for the background
> > tint), to do this with less pot luck/ messing about?
>
> I'm not sure I understand what you are looking for. How could you tint an
> image to a specific RGB color if each pixel has a different greyscale value
> to start with? You will end with different RGB values because of that. If
> you mean you want to add a specific RGB coloring to the image, you could do
> the following.
>
> 1. Convert the image to RGB.
> 2. Add a solid color layer with the RGB value you wanted.
> 3. Change the layer mode to 'Color'.
> 4. Flatten

I have my reader set to kill-file all message with @gmail string (too many
spams from @gmail and yahoo etc. account) so if you won't mind me quoting
yours.

I too don't have any clue with the word "TINT" means (I know what TINT is
but don't understand what the OP means), but I read the words Greyscale ->
Color so I am guessing the OP wants to turn some B&W to COLOR photo (wild
guess).

I don't remember all small detail, but repairing damged old photos and
converting old B&W photos to color etc. were the things I did to start
learning Photoshop. Or I was messing with those damged old photos to learn
as many commands and tricks as I can, and the last time I did was around 5-6
years ago with newer Photoshop to show some folks how simple it was (better
Photoshop with better options than older Photoshop). I don't remember all
small detail, but in general it's pretty simple (if I do then I could take
advantage of Layer and Layer Mask those weren't available then).

- Selecting the area you want to change (like skin, hair, shirt, pant, eyes,
lips etc.)

- Then use Hue/Sat (or whatever command I don't remember) to change/adjust
the color.

That's it! and it can't be much simpler than that.

Now with Layer, Layer Mask, Action etc.. you should be able to get thing
done much quicker (start with sloppy selection), cleaner. Or it shouldn't
take more than few short minutes to do it.

P.S. I often say few short minutes, but only if you know exactly what to do
and doing it so well. Cuz, for so many years I was doing Masking on nearly
98-99% of all photos I work on, but because of my health so I didn't touch
Photoshop for around 2 years.

Few days ago (Christmas photos), I had to work on some family Christmas
photos and the first few photos it took me around 30-45 minutes to do some
very basic Burn/Dodge and Layer Mask that I used to be able to do within 2-3
minutes (not only lot better but lot quicker). I still don't like most of
the results, and I was trying for small print (they should be ok with 8x10"
print but not so sure about larger print).
Sat, 01 January 2011 15:22 Go to previous messageGo to next message
John Stafford (Photoshop expert)
In article
<962716635315347303.014452nomail-please.invalid@news.supernews.com>,
Johan W. Elzenga <nomail@please.invalid> wrote:

> Rob Bradford <rob.bradford2805@gmail.com> wrote:

> > Is there a method (if you know the RGB valuses for the background
> > tint), to do this with less pot luck/ messing about?
>
> I'm not sure I understand what you are looking for. How could you tint an
> image to a specific RGB color if each pixel has a different greyscale value
> to start with? You will end with different RGB values because of that. If
> you mean you want to add a specific RGB coloring to the image, you could do
> the following.
>
> 1. Convert the image to RGB.
> 2. Add a solid color layer with the RGB value you wanted.
> 3. Change the layer mode to 'Color'.
> 4. Flatten

Yes, that's the way.

Johan, what do you think of using a duotone mode instead?
Sun, 02 January 2011 05:03 Go to previous messageGo to next message
nomail (Photoshop expert)
John Stafford <nhoj@droffats.net> wrote:
> In article
> <962716635315347303.014452nomail-please.invalid@news.supernews.com>,
> Johan W. Elzenga <nomail@please.invalid> wrote:
>
>> Rob Bradford <rob.bradford2805@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>> Is there a method (if you know the RGB valuses for the background
>>> tint), to do this with less pot luck/ messing about?
>>
>> I'm not sure I understand what you are looking for. How could you tint an
>> image to a specific RGB color if each pixel has a different greyscale value
>> to start with? You will end with different RGB values because of that. If
>> you mean you want to add a specific RGB coloring to the image, you could do
>> the following.
>>
>> 1. Convert the image to RGB.
>> 2. Add a solid color layer with the RGB value you wanted.
>> 3. Change the layer mode to 'Color'.
>> 4. Flatten
>
> Yes, that's the way.
>
> Johan, what do you think of using a duotone mode instead?

I'm sure there are several ways to get the same results.

--
Johan W. Elzenga, Editor/Photographer, www.johanfoto.com
Sun, 02 January 2011 18:20 Go to previous messageGo to next message
jones (Photoshop begginer)
Love your website Johan. Very nice.
Katherine




> --
> Johan W. Elzenga, Editor/Photographer, www.johanfoto.com
Sun, 02 January 2011 20:02 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Joel (Photoshop expert)
John Stafford <nhoj@droffats.net> wrote:

> In article
> <962716635315347303.014452nomail-please.invalid@news.supernews.com>,
> Johan W. Elzenga <nomail@please.invalid> wrote:
>
> > Rob Bradford <rob.bradford2805@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > Is there a method (if you know the RGB valuses for the background
> > > tint), to do this with less pot luck/ messing about?
> >
> > I'm not sure I understand what you are looking for. How could you tint an
> > image to a specific RGB color if each pixel has a different greyscale value
> > to start with? You will end with different RGB values because of that. If
> > you mean you want to add a specific RGB coloring to the image, you could do
> > the following.
> >
> > 1. Convert the image to RGB.
> > 2. Add a solid color layer with the RGB value you wanted.
> > 3. Change the layer mode to 'Color'.
> > 4. Flatten
>
> Yes, that's the way.
>
> Johan, what do you think of using a duotone mode instead?

I have never tried the Duotone option myself, but I looked at the video
tutorial and I don't think it's what the OP after (I may be wrong as I can't
figure out what s/he has in mind).

Or the Duotone (I hope it the right option I have in mind) will change the
color of the whole photo which is pretty similar to the regular command,
except it has more option and weirder result (I don't have any need for it
so I never tried myself).
Mon, 03 January 2011 03:56 Go to previous message
nomail (Photoshop expert)
"jones" <jones@nowhere.com> wrote:
> Love your website Johan. Very nice.
> Katherine

Thanks. I'm working hard to rebuild it and bring the 'static' part of the
site into the dynamic blog part. Right now, the static part is built with
frames and that makes it impossible to give somebody a 'deep link' directly
to the Photoshop tutorials, for example. I hope to have the new site up and
running by the end of the week at the latest. Content-wise it will remain
more or less the same.

--
Johan W. Elzenga, Editor/Photographer, www.johanfoto.com
Create a new topic Submit Reply
Goto Forum:

Adobe Photoshop

Adobe Photoshop techniques & help
Photoshop for Windows
Photoshop for Mac
Technical questions

Photoshop Elements

Adobe Photoshop Elements